2013 Technical Session 10 - Small Water Systems II

Monday, April 22, 1:55 - 5:00 pm, Okanagan Room


Moderator: Freda Leong, Associated Engineering

 

10.1 Sample Collection - Field to Reporting

10.2 Water-borne Disease Outbreaks in Canadian Small Drinking Water Systems

10.3 Source Protection Critical Control Points: Setting Priorities for Action

10.4 Disinfection Pathways For Small Water Systems

10.5 A Network Based Approach to Innovation and Technology Development: Case of VUV technology for small water systems

 


Small Water Systems II | 1:55 pm - 2:25 pm
10.1 Sample Collection – Field to Reporting
Presenter: Glen Craig, CARO Analytical Services, Kelowna, BC

 

 


As outlined in the 21st Edition of the Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater: The objective of sampling and testing is to demonstrate whether continuing compliance with specific regulatory requirements have been achieved. Samples are presented to the laboratory for specific determinations, with the sampler being responsible for collecting a valid and representative sample. Because of the increasing importance placed on verifying the accuracy and representativeness of data, greater emphasis is placed on proper sample collection, tracking, and preservation techniques. Often, laboratory personnel help plan a sampling program in consultation with the user of the test results. Such consultation is essential to ensure selected samples and analytical methods provide a sound and valid basis for answering the questions that prompted the sampling and that will meet regulatory and/or project-specific requirements.
 


Small Water Systems II | 2:30 pm - 3:00 pm
10.2 Water-borne Disease Outbreaks in Canadian Small Drinking Water Systems
Presenter: Sylvia Struck, PH. D., BC Centre for Disease Control and National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health, Vancouver, BC
Additional Contributors: Hannah Moffatt

 

 


Canadians generally have access to safe and secure drinking water. However, as demonstrated by the events of Walkerton in 2000, the exception can be tragic. Outbreaks of water-borne disease are preventable, yet evidence-informed policy and practice is hampered, in part, by our limited knowledge of drinking water systems that experience outbreaks and the factors that contribute to outbreaks in Canada. There is no national surveillance system for systematic collection of water-borne disease outbreak data. Investigating past water-borne disease outbreaks can therefore provide a valuable approach to collect information to inform practice and policy. This presentation will highlight the findings from three publications which assess water-borne disease outbreaks in Canada; two retrospective research studies and a case history analysis exploring recurring themes and patterns in Canadian and international settings. Specifically, the presentation will provide a brief overview of Canadian drinking water systems; describe trends of past water-borne disease outbreaks; describe characteristics and factors contributing to outbreaks in small drinking water systems; and discuss practices for preventing water-borne disease outbreaks in small drinking water systems.

 


Small Water Systems II | 3:05 pm - 3:35 pm
10.3 Source Protection Critical Control Points: Setting Priorities for Action
Presenter: Hugh Hamilton, Ph. D., P.Ag., Summit Environmental Consultants Inc., Vernon, BC
Additional Contributors: Marta Green, P.Geo. and Joe Alcock, P.Geo.

 

 


The protection of drinking water sources is the first component of the multi-barrier approach to ensuring that drinking water supplies pose negligible risk to public health, and is important for minimizing the potential for contamination of both surface water and groundwater sources.  In addition to being one of the barriers in the multi-barrier system, effective source protection can reduce the costs of drinking water treatment.  This presentation provides an overview of the regulatory framework behind source protection in Canada, and outlines the major steps in the development of practical source protection plans for surface water and groundwater supplies.  Included is a discussion of how risk assessment can be used to set priorities for source protection action for smaller systems where resources may be limited. The challenges faced by water suppliers in implementing source protection plans are also highlighted, such as having limited control over land use in the watershed or capture zone.
 
Presentation PDF


Small Water Systems II | 3:55 pm - 4:25 pm
10.4 Disinfection Pathways For Small Water Systems
Presenter: Garry Drachenberg, P.Eng., Associated Engineering, Edmonton, AB

 

 


The primary role of treatment is to render the water safe for consumption.  Achieving this objective is relatively straight forward providing appropriate front-end effort has been invested into understanding the “personality profile” of a given water source, identifying the treatment challenges posed by the source and customizing the treatment scheme to address the need.  This presentation will provide an overview of key disinfection issues, success impactors and techniques along with corresponding operational considerations to meet regulatory objectives.
 


Small Water Systems II | 4:30 pm - 5:00 pm
10.5 A Network based approach to innovation and technology development:  Case of VUV technology for small water systems
Presenter: Keyvan Malecki, MSc, DIC, RES’EAU-WaterNET Strategic Network, Vancouver, BC

 

 


The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) has been a major sponsor of Network based approach to innovation and technology development. One such network is RES’EAU-WaterNET, which has been focusing on development of robust and affordable technologies for drinking water treatment in small and rural communities.  Just like any water system, innovation processes can fail and lead to undesired outcomes; hence, they would require proper management and treatment.  Only then, they provide outcome of tangible benefits for small systems. In this presentation, an instance of successful approach and strategy towards technology development will be presented. We will discuss the next generation of UV technology capable of providing simultaneous disinfection and chemical contaminant removal.   Path from idea to eventual scale-up and proof of concept will be discussed, and the performance and cost data will be presented.



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