2013 Technical Session 5 - Small Water Systems I (SWS Symposium)

Monday, April 22, 8:00 - 11:40 am, Okanagan Room


Moderator: Eric Pettit, GENIVAR

 

5.1 & 5.2 A Financial Best Management Practice Guide for Small Water Systems

5.3 Boys Road Pump Station – When Old Infrastructure Requires New Ideas

5.4 Cook’s Ferry Indian Band and Spences Bridge (TNRD) Successful Partnership – Improving Water Systems and Ending Boil Water Advisories

5.5 Small Water Systems: Simple, Effective Groundwater Treatment for Organic Matter, Arsenic, & Manganese

5.6 Insurance Program for Small Water Systems

 


Small Water Systems I | 8:00 am - 9:05 am
5.1 & 5.2 A Financial Best Management Practice Guide for Small Water Systems
Presenter: Vernon Rogers, M.Sc. P. Eng., Sustainable Infrastructure Society (SIS), Victoria, BC

 

 


This presentation will cover the use of six Best management Practices that have been developed for small water systems (SWS) in British Columbia (BC). The development of these BMPs was sponsored by the Union of BC Municipalities, and they address key financial issues faced by SWS in BC.  The BMPs help provide the solutions to immediate and practical problems faced by SWS such as the absence of financial provisions for infrastructure renewal, and the inability to borrow money from private-sector lending institutions. They include practical tools in the form of worksheets and checklists.  Each BMP is about four pages in length and can be used by SWS with no or limited outside resources. To help develop the BMPs a pilot project was undertaken, in which selected SWS from various areas of BC were invited to apply the BMPs to their system, and to comment on the process. The results of the pilot project will be outlined as part of the presentation. The use of the BMPs by SWS will improve the opportunity for the SWS to obtain a loan from a lending institution. The Sustainable infrastructure Society (SIS) is currently developing a program specifically for small water systems, which will enable community water supply systems to conveniently borrow money from a lending institution for capital improvements to the water system. The integration of this program with the financial BMPs will described as part of the presentation.

Presentation PDF- Part I

Presentation PDF- Part 2

Presentation PDF- Part 3

Presentation PDF- Part 4
 


Small Water Systems I | 9:10 am - 9:40 am
5.3 Boys Road Pump Station – When Old Infrastructure Requires New Ideas
Presenter: Keith Kohut, M.A.Sc, P.Eng., Associated Engineering (BC) Ltd., Burnaby, BC
Additional Contributors: Tom Robinson, M.A.Sc., P.Eng., Associated Engineering (BC) Ltd., Burnaby, BC

 

 


Even at the best of times, retrofitting and repurposing existing drinking water infrastructure can be challenging.  When combined with a seismically vulnerable site and a challenging application of treatment technology, a retrofit can become a puzzle requiring a balance of innovative solutions. For a community on Vancouver Island, an upgrade to an existing pump station was required to provide continuous disinfection to the system.  While the pump station had an emergency chlorination system already installed, the community wanted to keep their water free of chlorine except during emergencies.  UV was therefore considered for virus inactivation. The first challenge was selecting an appropriate dose to apply, involving an evaluation of microbiological data, dose-response studies and consultation with the health authority.  The second challenge was that the water system operated at a pressure in the order of 200 psi, making this the first application in North America of MP UV reactors in a high-pressured drinking water system.  To house the new treatment equipment an extension to the existing pump station was required.  A geotechnical assessment revealed that the site was built on soils at high risk of liquefying should a significant seismic event occur.  As drinking water supply infrastructure, the pump station needed to be able to continue operating immediately after such an event.  At the same time, the existing building and the add-ons were not designed to the same building standards, lending to the risk of the two parts of the building behaving different during a seismic event.  This presentation discusses each of these retrofit challenges and the combination of solutions used to address them.
 
Presentation PDF


Small Water Systems I | 10:00 am - 10:30 am
5.4 Cook’s Ferry Indian Band and Spences Bridge (TNRD) Successful Partnership – Improving Water Systems and Ending Boil Water Advisories
Presenter: Gerson Neiva, P.Eng., Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada, Maple Ridge, BC

 

 


This presentation provides an overview of a successful partnership between a local municipality under the jurisdiction of the Thompson Nicola Regional District (TNRD) and a First Nation community in southern British Columbia. In 2006, the community of Spences Bridge (TNRD) and the Cook’s Ferry Indian Band established a formal agreement to work together with the objective of providing safe drinking water to these adjacent communities by improving the existing water systems and ending numerous boil water advisories. With funds from both the Provincial and the Federal governments, the communities proceeded with a comprehensive feasibility analysis of potential options for improvements to the existing surface and groundwater sources. A cost effective option was identified and agreed upon between all stakeholders. Pre-design and detailed design was completed in a timely manner and a Municipal Type Service Agreement (MTSA) was developed between both parties under legal advice and input from the funding agencies. Construction is scheduled to be substantially completed by March 2013. The project will address previous concerns raised not only by the water purveyors, but also by the Provincial and Federal agencies involved with these communities.

Presentation PDF
 


Small Water Systems I | 10:35 am - 11:05 am
5.5 Small Water Systems: Simple, Effective Groundwater Treatment for Organic Matter, Arsenic, & Manganese
Presenter: Mark Burger, P.Eng., Kerr Wood Leidal Associates Ltd., Burnaby, BC
Additional Contributors: Dave Hanson, B.Sc., Water Treatment Specialist, Kerr Wood Leidal Associated Ltd., Burnaby, BC

 

 


This presentation illustrates, through a case study, that it is possible to develop simple and effective groundwater treatment systems to provide safe drinking water for remote communities.  The water supply and treatment infrastructure in question consists of new wells in a confined aquifer.   The water from this aquifer required treatment for arsenic, natural organic matter, and manganese.   This led to a unique combination of three stages of pressurized treatment vessels to provide a simple passive treatment process that relies on the use of GAC, a manganese removal filter and an arsenic absorptive media. The resulting water treatment plant includes re-use of backwash water in the treatment process as there is no community wastewater collection system and to achieve high overall water use efficiency.   The water treatment plant operation is monitored by an inexpensive, non-proprietary real-time monitoring and data collection system, complete with alarm events.  This information can be securely observed by operators, monitoring agencies, and others, using any internet browser.

Presentation PDF
 


Small Water Systems I | 11:10 am - 11:40 am
5.6 Insurance Program for Small Water Systems
Presenter: Wayne Fiddler, Capri Insurance, Penticton, BC

 

 


Small water systems are always grappling with the problem of insurance. Why do I need it? What do I need to insure? What are my exposures and a myriad of other questions. This presentation will examine some of these questions. We will look at liability insurance, property insurance, boiler and machinery insurance and directors and officers insurance. What they cover, why you may want this coverage for your system, and what you should look for when buying this insurance. We will look at the requirements underwriters have to provide coverage and look at some of the “best practices” used by systems that reduce insurance premiums. We will also examine those things which are not covered and what your system can do to reduce their exposure to loss.

Presentation PDF



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