2013 Technical Session 17 - Water Resources

Tuesday, April 23, 1:55 - 5:00 pm, Kootenay Room


Moderator: Richard Harper, AECOM

 


17.1 A Bio-Infiltration Pond for Storm Water Run-off Treatment from Industrial and Agricultural Lands, City of Abbotsford

17.2 BC Water Use Reporting Centre Okanagan Pilot: Successful Model for Water Use Management Throughout BC

17.3 Hydraulic Fracturing Focus on Water

17.4 Innovative Stormwater Features at Mountain Equipment Co-op New Sites

17.5 Wilson Farm Habitat Enhancement Project: Application of Tide Regulated Gates to Tidal Habitat Enhancement


Water Resources | 1:55 pm - 2:25 pm
17.1 A Bio-Infiltration Pond for Storm Water Run-off Treatment from Industrial and Agricultural Lands, City of Abbotsford
Presenter: Tyagu Mathialagan, MASc., P. Eng., City of Abbotsford, Abbotsford, BC
Additional Contributors: Melvin Mayfield, P. Eng., City of Abbotsford, Abbotsford, BC; Seamus Frain, P. Eng., Opus dayton & Knight, North Vancouver, BC



The City of Abbotsford recently completed the construction of a unique storm water detention and infiltration system for draining approximately 80 ha of primarily industrial and agricultural lands. The infiltration site is an abandoned gravel quarry, totaling 2.8 ha of land. The objective of the facility is to infiltrate the excess run-off from the catchment area in a manner that protects the groundwater quality in the underlying Abbotsford-Sumas aquifer. Abbotsford-Sumas aquifer is a shallow aquifer that supplies drinking water to approximately 100,000 people in Abbotsford, Langley, Sumas and Lynden, WA. It is imperative for the City that the infiltration system provides detention for 1:100 year storm and offer storm water treatment for a variety of contaminants. Runoffs from industrial and agricultural catchment areas are expected to contain small amounts of heavy metals, hydrocarbons, suspended solids, road salts, nutrients, trace pesticides and fertilizers. The uniqueness of the infiltration system comes from the combination of facility-design configuration, specially selected growing media and vegetation. Pilot tests were conducted for selecting a suitable infiltration media. Cascade Ecomedia was selected as an approved product for installation as it was able to achieve specific water quality objectives, demonstrate superior hydraulic conductivity and support plant growth through wet and drought like conditions. The City will monitor the performance of the infiltration facility in the coming months. Groundwater from a series of wells around the site will be tested for various parameters. Infiltration rates will also be tested periodically.

Presentation PDF
 


Water Resources | 2:30 pm - 3:00 pm
17.2 BC Water Use Reporting Centre Okanagan Pilot: Successful Model for Water Use Management Throughout BC
Presenter: Jonathan Lowe, P.Eng., Urban Systems, Kelowna, BC
Additional Contributors: Nelson Jatel, Okangan Basin Water Board, Kelowna, BC; Michelle Cook, MASc, Urban Systems, Kelowna, BC



The Okanagan is at high risk for future water shortages because of its arid climate and rapid population growth. To manage this risk, the Okanagan Basin Water Board, with the BC Ministry of Environment and a number of other provincial and federal agencies are supporting a pilot project in the Okanagan called the BC Water Use Reporting Centre. The BC Water Use Reporting Centre is a simple, streamlined, web-based system for reporting and accessing water use information for all medium to large water users in the Okanagan. The ongoing lack of water use data across the province significantly limits water managers’ ability to assemble robust water demand estimates, which in turn reduces the credibility of water planning and allocation decisions. This fundamental problem persists throughout the other 291,000 watersheds in BC where water use data is incompletely managed. The BC Water Use Reporting Centre provides better access to and delivery of water-use information. This presentation will establish the BC Water Use Reporting Centre as an easy to use online system that provides an efficient and secure location for reporting water-use data. Currently, water licensees are required to report their annual water use once a year on paper forms to the BC Ministry of Environment for accounting and financial purposes. The presentation will report on the benefits derived from the BC Water Use Reporting Centre to water licencees in the Okanagan, and the possible benefits to the whole province if the BC Water Use Reporting Centre is adopted province wide.

Presentation PDF
 


Water Resources | 3:05 pm - 3:35 pm
17.3 Hydraulic Fracturing Focus on Water
Presenter: Don Nash, P.Eng., BCWWA Water Sustainability Committee, Burnaby, BC



On March 23rd and 24th, 2012 BCWWA held a knowledge sharing event in Fort St. John. This two‐day event presented an overview of hydraulic fracturing in BC with a focus on water demand and usage, regulatory issues as well as community and agricultural perspectives. The purpose of the workshop was to improve our understanding of the impact of the use of hydraulic fracturing on water resources, as it relates to water supply, water demand and water quality and to work with regulators, the industry and other water users to ensure effective management of water resources. This workshop was the first step to ensuring that our membership has access to the best information available. Fort St. John was chosen as the location for the event to highlight the importance of a community‐based perspective when exploring issues that are relevant to a specific geographic setting. Hydraulic‐fracturing takes place in the north eastern region of the province. This paper is a follow-up to that event and summarizes the information presented at the workshop. Where applicable, information gaps or areas for further information gathering have been identified or flagged to inform BCWWA of next steps in our pursuit of sustainable water management in areas of this province where hydraulic fracturing is taking place.

Report PDF
 


Water Resources | 3:55 pm - 4:25 pm
17.4 Innovative Stormwater Features at Mountain Equipment Co-op New Sites
Presenter: Crystal Campbell, P.Eng., Kerr Wood Leidal Associates Ltd., Burnaby, BC
Additional Contributors: Caroline Gort, P.Eng., Kerr Wood Leidal Associates, Calgary, AB; Peter Tapp, Kerr Wood Leidal Associates, Burnaby, BC



Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC) has lofty goals for sustainable development that provides high performance buildings and sites while maximizing environment protection. A new retail store in North Vancouver was constructed and opened its doors in 2012. A new corporate head office in Vancouver will be constructed in 2014. Both buildings exhibit a “design with nature” approach to redevelopment, and both sites qualify for LEED® certification. MEC elected to exceed LEED requirements and strive for progressive stormwater management. LEED credits for stormwater quantity control and treatment, and water-use efficiency and reduction were met. The North Vancouver retail store features: rain gardens providing water quality treatment for runoff from the parking lot and roof; on-site capacity to infiltrate up to the 10-year storm; a disconnection of the site’s minor and major stormwater conveyance systems from the municipal storm sewer system; and reduced potable water use by utilizing the porous ground as a reservoir and pumping groundwater for toilet flushing. The head office building will feature: reuse of harvested rainwater from the building’s roof for toilet flushing; a green roof and urban agriculture; and a bio-filtration rain garden for the parking lot.

Presentation PDF
 


Water Resources | 4:30 pm - 5:00 pm
17.5 Wilson Farm Habitat Enhancement Project: Application of Tide Regulated Gates to Tidal Habitat Enhancement
Presenter: Craig Sutherland, P.Eng., Kerr Wood Leidal Associates Ltd., Burnaby, BC
Additional Contributors: Robin Taylor, Transportation Investment Corporation; Marc Gaboury, LGL Ltd.


The Wilson Farm Habitat Enhancement Project is the largest environmental enhancement undertaking performed as part of the Port Mann Highway 1 (PMH1) improvements. The 65 ha site had high intertidal habitat values prior to the early 1900s when dikes were constructed and the land was converted to farmland. The project was based on re-introducing tidal flows into a network of existing agricultural drainage and a new constructed habitat. Approximately four km of tidally-influenced channels for young salmon and other fish was re-established. In addition to the need to re-establish fish habitat, the project also had to balance the needs for wildlife conservation and other park users. As the majority of the important old-field wildlife habitat in the area was below high tide elevation, the project required that these lands be protected from inundation at high tide. An innovative tide gate design, which allows for tidal action during low to medium tide levels while closing to prevent inundation of fields at high tide, was key to the project success. This tide regulated gate functions using the hydraulic forces of the incoming and outflowing tides, with no need for external power. The gate provided a cost effective solution by allowing existing but unconnected agricultural channels to be re-opened to tidal flow, resulting in less excavation of new channels for the same habitat gain. Most importantly, juveniles from all five pacific salmon species were observed in the Wilson Farm channels in the spring of 2012 for the first time in over 100 years.

Presentation PDF



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