2013 Technical Session 16 - Miscellaneous Drips & Drops

Tuesday, April 23, 1:55 - 5:00 pm, Skaha Room


Moderator: Anthony Greville, Waterhouse Environmental Services Corporation

 

16.1 Differences in Intestinal Infectious Disease Risk in a Rural and Urban Community with Varied Water Supply and Sewage Disposal Systems

16.2 Municipal vs Industrial Water Reuse - Things to Consider

16.3 Exploring Potential – How Does the Integrative Design Process Make This Happen? A Lions Gate Secondary Treatment Project Update

16.4 Treatment and Regrowth Considerations for Reclaimed Water

16.5 Energy Benchmarking: A Vital Step in Enhancing Sustainability


Miscellaneous Drips & Drops | 1:55 pm - 2:25 pm
16.1 Differences in Intestinal Infectious Disease Risk in a Rural and Urban Community with Varied Water Supply and Sewage Disposal Systems
Presenter: Kay Teschke, PhD, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC
Additional Contributors: Neil Bellack, MD, PhD, Ottawa, ON; Hui Shen, PhD, UBC, Vancouver, BC; Jim Atwater, PhD, UBC, Vancouver, BC; Mieke Koehoorn, PhD, UBC, Vancouver, BC; Ying MacNab, PhD, UBC, Vancouver, BC; Hans Schreier, PhD, UBC, Vancouver, BC; Judy Isaac-Renton, MD, UBC, Vancouver, BC



Studies of water-related gastrointestinal infections are usually directed at outbreaks. Few have examined endemic illness or compared rates across different water supply and sewage disposal systems. We conducted a cohort study of physician visits and hospitalizations for endemic intestinal infectious diseases in a mixed rural and urban community near Vancouver, Canada. Cohort members and their disease events were defined via medical insurance data from 1995 through 2003. Environmental data were from municipal, provincial, and federal government sources. We examined associations between disease events and water and sewage systems, socio-demographics, and temporal factors. The cohort included 126,499 individuals and approximately 190,000,000 person-days. Crude incidence rates were 1,353 physician visits and 33.8 hospitalizations for intestinal infectious diseases per 100,000 person-years. There were higher disease rates in females, in the very young and the elderly, and in residents of low income areas. Increased duration of area residence was associated with reduced risk. Water supply chlorination was associated with reduced incidence. Municipal water systems with the highest proportions of surface water had increased incidence compared to municipal and private well water sources. Municipal sewer systems were associated with increased risk. There was increased crude incidence with increasing precipitation in the population served by surface water supplies, but this trend did not remain with adjustment for other variables. This large cohort study, with objective data on exposures and outcomes, demonstrated associations between endemic infectious intestinal diseases and factors related to water supply, sewage disposal, socio-demographics, and duration of residency.

Presentation PDF


Miscellaneous Drips & Drops | 2:30 pm - 3:00 pm
16.2 Municipal vs Industrial Water Reuse - Things to Consider
Presenter: Lalith Liyanage, Ph.D.,P.Eng., WorleyParsons Canada, Edmonton, AB



First, this paper summarizes the most common municipal and industrial water reuse applications in North America, Australia and Europe. This paper also describes the current and emerging risks of treated municipal wastewater re-use in both municipal and industrial applications. Particular emphasis was given to the direct and indirect public health risks associated with the water re-use. A case is made that the industrial water reuse is significantly more beneficial in terms of public health protection compared to that of the most common municipal water reuse.
 

 


Miscellaneous Drips & Drops | 3:05 pm - 3:35 pm
16.3 Exploring Potential – How Does the Integrative Design Process Make This Happen? A Lions Gate Secondary Treatment Project Update
Presenter: Laurie Ford, P.Eng, LEED AP, Metro Vancouver, Burnaby, BC

 

 



As identified in Metro Vancouver’s Integrated Liquid Waste and Resource Management Plan, the existing primary Lions Gate Wastewater Treatment Plant will be replaced by a new secondary plant by 2020. In upgrading the Lions Gate plant, Metro Vancouver has embarked on an Integrative Design Process that is proving to realize this project’s potential to demonstrate Metro Vancouver’s commitment to sustainability, provide leadership and build a model wastewater treatment facility, while fulfilling its mandate of provision of a core service. Grounded in the key project objectives, the integrative design process is a powerful, engaging and creative process that allows the project definition team to expand the potential of the Lions Gate Secondary Treatment Plant beyond the site boundaries.  The project team through this process has developed a range of diverse concepts that expand the potential for this project to be transformational with respect to how secondary treatment, sustainability, community integration and resource recovery can become truly integrated. The presentation will include insight into the integrative design process, an update of the concept work to date and lay out the next steps in Metro Vancouver’s approach for this new integrated facility.

Presentation PDF
 


Miscellaneous Drips & Drops | 3:55 pm - 4:25 pm
16.4 Treatment and Regrowth Considerations for Reclaimed Water
Presenter: Garry Drachenberg, P.Eng, Associated Engineering, Edmonton, AB


Reclamation of treated municipal wastewater effluent has become common in areas of the developed world in which supply of potable water is limited. In some cases, direct potable reuse is practiced; direct potable reuse is still rare but increased application is foreseen in the future in water constrained areas. Reclaimed effluent is typically treated and disinfected at the wastewater treatment plant, often to a very high degree. However, the benefits of that disinfection can be lost by regrowth of organisms within a distribution system. Biofilm growth and the presence of micro-organism that are well known in distribution systems for potable water can be even greater challenges in the distribution of reclaimed water. Higher concentrations of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus that are usually present in reclaimed water can provide favourable conditions for bacterial growth. This presentation discusses anticipated reclaimed water treated effluent qualities and targets, and considerations related to disinfection to maintain water quality within reclaimed water distribution systems.
 


Miscellaneous Drips & Drops | 4:30 pm - 5:00 pm
16.5 Energy Benchmarking: A Vital Step in Enhancing Sustainability
Presenter: Susan Spruston, P.Eng., AECOM, Burnaby, BC
Additional Contributors: Alexander Kolesov, M.Sc., Project Analyst, AECOM, Burnaby, BC; David Main, AECOM, Project Director, AECOM, Burnaby, BC



Conducted successfully, energy optimization not only saves money, but also reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Energy benchmarking is a proven tool to enhance efforts in energy optimization, as is identified in WEF's Roadmap to Energy Sustainability (WEF 2012). The National Water and Wastewater Benchmarking Initiative (NWWBI), based here in British Columbia, has been benchmarking water and wastewater treatment and conveyance (pump station) energy consumption since 1999 using single parameter performance indicators. This process was enhanced in 2010 with the introduction and piloting of the Energy Index published by the Water Research Federation (WRF). The Energy Index is a multi-parameter performance indicator that considers plant size, influent/effluent quality, treatment process, type and quantity of energy used to calculate a single energy consumption score from 1 to 100.  Regardless of the type of benchmarking, the key to performance improvement starts with asking the question of "why" the systems perform differently. This presentation will review the different tools that can be used to benchmark energy use in water and wastewater treatment and conveyance, and how to use these tools most effectively in support of energy optimization efforts.

Presentation PDF



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