2013 Technical Session 13 - Municipal Utility Management II

Tuesday, April 23, 8:00 - 11:40 am, Shuswap Room

 


Moderator: Mike Nolan, Kerr Wood Leidal

 

13.1 Christchurch Earthquake- Impacts to the Water and Sewer Systems

13.2 Many Approaches to Water Metering- Getting Your Rate Right

13.3 Moving Utilities to Local Government Ownership - The Regional District of Central Okanagan Utility Acquisition Policy

13.4 New Ways to Promote Your Business and Effectively Supply Knowledge for the Water & Wastewater Industry

13.5 Risky Business- Providing Community Water and Sewer Services While Minimizing Risk of Liability

13.6 The Legal Update- A Session to Highlight and Summarize Key Pieces of Current and Upcoming Legislation Applicable to Water and Wastewater Providers

 


Municipal Utility Management II | 8:00 am - 8:30 am
13.1 Christchurch Earthquake - Impacts to the Water and Sewer Systems
Presenter: Gurjit Sangha, P.Eng., Opus DaytonKnight, North Vancouver, BC
Additional Contributors: Philip McFarlane, Principal Engineer, Opus Consultants Ltd., Auckland, New Zealand

 


The recent magnitude 7.7 earthquake in the Haida Gwaii Region of BC reminds us of our seismic exposure on the West Coast. Our infrastructure is susceptible to significant earthquake risk and it is vital that we understand the need for earthquake preparedness. This paper will explore the issues faced to the lineal sewer system at Christchurch, New Zealand with its 2010 and 2011 earthquakes. Christchurch is of special interest as it has similar soil conditions and methods of construction to many areas of the West Coast. A 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck Christchurch in September 2010 resulting in significant damage to city buildings and infrastructure. Damage included cracks, collapses, joint breakage and loss of gradient – all causing significant environmental impacts. On February 22, 2011, a 6.3 magnitude aftershock struck Christchurch, causing massive damage to its infrastructure.

Presentation PDF


Municipal Utility Management II | 8:35 am - 9:05 am
13.2 Many Approaches to Water Metering – Getting Your Rate Right
Presenter: Claude Perreault, Regional Sales Manager, Neptune Technology Group, Mississauga, ON
Co-Presenter: Jean Pierre Joly, B.A.Sc., Project Manager/Consultant, Victoria, BC

Additional Contributors: Angela Zapp, P.Eng., MBA, Neptune Technology Group, Missisauga, ON; Darlene McNichol, Product Manager, Neptune Technology Group, Mississauga, ON

 


At the fastest rate in Canada, water utilities across British Columbia continue to trend towards water metering as utilities gain a stronger understanding about the fundamental value that metering offers with respect to water sustainability and system management. There is a natural progression towards metering and this session will explore the different types of programs that utilities can implement as a progression towards full metering (industry/commercial meters, new housing, volunteer and universal). Utilities embarking on various types of metering programs frequently ask: “How do we know we implemented the right rate?” This session is ideal for those who would like to gain a better understanding of how a utility can establish a rate structure for each type of metering program, and recognize what key factors need to be considered to ensure that their rates achieve certain objectives. Topics widely examined during rate design include: full cost recovery, conservation oriented rates, choosing fixed and variable percentages, addressing revenue shortfalls and revenue stability. This session will be relevant to communities of all sizes and is highly relevant to utilities with varying degrees of metering.

Presentation PDF


Municipal Utility Management II | 9:10 am - 9:40 am
13.3 Moving Utilities to Local Government Ownership - The Regional District of Central Okanagan Utility Acquisition Policy
Presenter: John Dumbrell, MCIP, Urban Systems, Kamloops, BC
Additional Contributors: Chris Radford, A.Sc.T., Director of Environmental Services, Regional District of Central Okanagan

 


Within the boundaries of the Regional District of Central Okanagan (RDCO) there exist a number of water and sanitary sewer utilities that are not owned and operated by the RDCO or its member municipalities. These utilities take various forms including private systems, improvement districts, strata corporations and other arrangements. In some instances, these utilities desire transition to ownership and operation by the RDCO for reasons including current inability to meet prevailing regulations, liability concerns, challenges in finding qualified operators and potential access to senior government funding programs. In response to mounting requests, the RDCO prepared a Utility Acquisition Policy which was adopted by the Board of Directors. This policy begins by setting out a level of service which utilities would have to provide if they were to come under RDCO ownership. A thorough acquisition process is articulated, including the manner in which the process is initiated, procedures for preliminary and comprehensive assessments, conditions to be fulfilled and a priority-setting framework for use by the RDCO Board if multiple candidates come forward. The policy also describes the manner in which costs for moving through the acquisition process are recovered.

Presentation PDF


Municipal Utility Management II | 10:00 am - 10:30 am
13.4 New Ways to Promote your Business and Effectively Supply Knowledge for the Water & Wastewater Industry
Presenter: Mike Gosselin, President of the EOCP, Environmental Operators Certification Program, Burnaby, BC
Additional Contributors: Jim McQuarrie, Superintendent of the Lulu Island Wastewater Treatment Facility, Metro Vancouver, Delta, BC

 


Whether your product or consultancy relates to small water systems or large municipal utility operations, success essentially includes a form of knowledge transfer. Your clients must be able to “maintain and sustain” to certain standards following your departure, given the potential public health risk, risk of operator injuries, as well as capital and operation costs with equipment not maintained. Whatever knowledge transfer/training you do is an investment. It can reduce risks including those to your reputation and overhead, and the time required to address complaints and perform remedial efforts. You can make your knowledge transfer/training more effective so operators understand, retain and apply your information – and most importantly, are motivated to do so. Operators are required, like most professions, to take some continuing education units (CEUs) biannually so they can do their job appropriately. They need: relevant training and credible instructors who share ‘real life’ experience with operators. Your knowledge transfer could meet all these needs by providing your specifically designed courses for a facility. This could help participating operators obtain some of their CEUs from your accredited training. To make this opportunity available, you can apply to become a Recognized Instructor and make an application for your course. Enter the Environmental Operators Certification Program’s (EOCP) Training Registry (TR). In this session you learn about the TR’s 3 areas: Get Training (a database); Give Training (applications/guides); and Grow, Career Info (standards help). Find out how to use the TR for marketing, gap analysis and helping ensure your courses are effective.

Presentation PDF


Municipal Utility Management II | 10:35 am - 11:05 am
13.5 Risky Business - Providing Community Water and Sewer Services While Minimizing Risk of Liability
Presenter: Rina Thakar, LL.B, LL.M, Valkyrie Law Group LLP, North Vancouver, BC
Additional Contributors: Sonia Sahota, P. Eng, LL.B, Valkyrie Law Group, Vancouver, BC

 


The responsibility for providing basic services such as drinking water, sanitary sewer and storm water collection systems usually fall to local governments. Their roles continue to be challenged by growing demands on existing assets from development, aging infrastructure as well as potential effects of climate change and extreme weather conditions. The obligation to provide safe access to community services, such as water and sewer, must be satisfied while minimizing the risk of liability. This presentation will briefly introduce participants to the regulatory roles and responsibilities of water and sewer service providers. It will provide a more detailed discussion on the legal risks associated with the provision of these services and highlight some of the legislative and contractual tools available to minimize such risk.

Presentation PDF
 


Municipal Utility Management II | 11:10 am - 11:40 am
13.6 The Legal Update - A Session to Highlight and Summarize Key Pieces of Current and Upcoming Legislation Applicable to Water and Wastewater Providers
Presenter: Rina Thakar, LL.B, LL.M, Valkyrie Law Group LLP, North Vancouver, BC
Additional Contributors: Sonia Sahota, P. Eng, LL.B, Valkyrie Law Group, Vancouver, BC

 


Municipal utility providers are subject to a myriad of legislative instruments that affect their management and operation. This presentation will provide an update on, and summary of, key pieces of legislation affecting water and wastewater, including the new 2012 Municipal Wastewater Regulation, the proposed modernization of the Water Act, as well as an update on the impending Wastewater Systems Effluent Regulations, among others.

Presentation PDF



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