2013 Technical Session 11 - Asset Management II

Tuesday, April 23, 8:00 - 11:40 am, Vaseaux Room


Moderator: Michelle Sorensen, CTQ Consultants Ltd.

 

11.1 Assessment of the City of Abbotsford Underground Concrete Stormwater Detention Tanks

11.2 Integrating Asset Management into the Design of a 150 GL/yr Desalination Plant in Australia

11.3 Live Forcemain Condition Assessment for City of Calgary

11.4 Rationalizing a Management Strategy for a 150 year Brick Sewer Inventory in Victoria, BC

11.5 The Forgotten Asset: A Strategic Risk-Based Approach to Culvert Asset Management

11.6 Tracking Pump Station Ownership Costs: 9-Year Asset Management Case Study

 


Asset Management II | 8:00 am - 8:30 am
11.1 Assessment of the City of Abbotsford Underground Concrete Stormwater Detention Tanks
Presenter: Meghdad Hoseini, M.Sc. PhD Candidate, Levelton Consultants Ltd., Richmond, BC
Additional Contributors: Kathy Zhang, P.Eng., M.A.Sc., City of Abbotsford, Abbotsford, BC

 


The City of Abbotsford initiated a multi-year inspection program in 2009 on the City’s owned underground concrete stormwater detention tanks. The purpose of the project is to provide a base line to be used in support of, and implementation of, the City Infrastructure Management System. The objective of the inspections is to provide the City of Abbotsford with information as to the present condition of the stormwater detention tanks with respect to their structural integrity and functionality of control devices and to provide recommendations for future inspection, maintenance, and repair priorities, if necessary. Between 2009 and 2012, a total of 68 tanks were inspected. Confined Space Hazard Assessments and Confined Space Entry Procedures were developed specific to each group of tanks. A Field Inspection Sheet with a ranking system was also developed as a template to be used in future inspection programs. These forms are used to record detailed information for each tank, as well as to provide rating criteria with respect to urgency of repair and maintenance required. Each tank was rated from 1 to 5 where 1 means no defect and 5 means immediate action required. The rating criteria were chosen to be consistent with the City’s asset management system ranking. This presentation will include scope of the project, project management, safety issues, methodology, summary of the findings on the present state of the tanks, recommendations for future inspection and maintenance programs, and implementation of recommendations.

Presentation PDF
 


Asset Management II | 8:35 am - 9:05 am
11.2 Integrating Asset Management into the Design of a 150 GL/yr Desalination Plant in Australia
Presenter: Will Nash, EIT, Materials Engineer - Asset Management, AECOM, Burnaby, BC

 


This presentation will focus on the experience gained integrating asset-management concepts into the design of a desalination plant in Australia. The PPP created a variety of assets, including intake and outfall tunnels, desalinating and potabilising plant, force mains, power mains, a park reservation and administrative buildings. Due to the nature of the agreement, where the constructor will operate and maintain the plant for thirty years before handing it over to the state, it was recognized that 70 to 80% of lifecycle costs are determined during design and the best time and opportunity to implement asset management is at project inception. Working closely with stakeholders, including O&M, procurement, quality control, engineering, architecture and finance, an asset management system was implemented, and asset data captured progressively over the course of design, procurement and construction. Asset management principals such as risk-centred maintenance and life cycle costing were also used to optimize the plant’s design for operations and maintenance.

Presentation PDF
 


Asset Management II | 9:10 am - 9:40 am
11.3 Live Forcemain Condition Assessment for City of Calgary
Presenter: Tim Ross, P. Eng., Pure Technologies Ltd., Calgary, AB

 


A recent development for the waste water industry is the introduction of a new inline, in service inspection tool named PipeDiver.   In December of 2011, the City of Calgary in an agreement with CH2MHILL engaged Pure Technologies to inspect in service forcemain pipeline serving the Bonnyville Waste Water Treatment plant.  This line could not be taken out of service for inspection therefore the solution was developed using the PipeDiver tool designed to inspect both PCCP C301 and C303 designed pressure pipelines for deterioration of the prestressing wires and bar wrapped reinforcing structures with in the composite of the pipe material.   These pipelines have never been inspected and at an age of some 40 years, understanding the effects of internal corrosion and corrosion driven deterioration of the pipe wall materials was a necessary action – the decision to use PipeDiver was made.  In December, the tool was launched at the Bonnyville plant and successfully navigated the 12km pipeline, delivering the hoped for condition assessment of this critical waste water pipeline.  The tool was launched at the Bonnyville plant site by depressurizing the pipeline, removing a pipe section, inserting the tool, buttoning up the pipeline and sending the tool on its way utilizing the flow in the pipe to propel the tool.  This inspection went largely as planned with the tool did arrive at the removal siteon schedule and subsequent downloading/analysis of the data has provided insights on the condition of the pipeline.  Projects such as this require a large amount of up front data and plans review along with site visits and meeting with the owners to identify the hydraulic profiles of the pipeline and more importantly to establish a protocol for the inspection that does provide unilateral and consistent flow rates during the inline inspection.  With excellent support from the City of Calgary the inspection was carried out successfully.
 
Presentation PDF


Asset Management II | 10:00 am - 10:30 am
11.4 Rationalizing a Management Strategy for a 150 year Brick Sewer Inventory in Victoria, BC
Presenter: Christopher Macey, P. Eng., AECOM, Winnipeg, MB
Additional Contributors: Matt Witchard, AECOM, Victoria, BC; Mike Brady, P. Eng., Victoria, BC, AECOM; Carla Coghlan, City of Victoria, Victoria, BC

 


This presentation covers the assessment and development of a short and long term management plan for the City of Victoria Brick Sewer Storm Drain Infrastructure. Originally constructed as combined sewers in the 1860’s the inventory has long been converted to storm sewer service.  The inventory is comprised of nearly 10 km of brick sewer with largely non-circular cross sections including both egg and arch shape cross sections ranging in sizes from 914 mm x 610 mm to 2100 mm x 2855 mm (HxW).  The physical condition of the inventory ranges sewers in pristine condition (SPG of 1, 150 years later) to some in advanced states of deterioration (SPG 5). The inventory traverses a wide range of native soils ranging from running cohesionless soils with a high water table to competent cohesive soils and rock cuts.  Surface development over the infrastructure is also highly variable and includes conventional, mature urban development, homes developed over the pipe and cemeteries developed over the pipe. The management strategy was developed using a risk based condition assessment approach and the deployment of a suite of conventional and advanced condition assessment tools.  The rehabilitation approach is heavily driven by the use of pure trenchless and minimum excavation technologies and will require the utilization of convention CIPP, CIPP with reinforced felts as well as segmental GRP technologies.  The long term management plan integrates planned rehab with systematic condition assessment to maximize the length of time to implement the program with minimal increase in risk exposure.

Presentation PDF
 


Asset Management II | 10:35 am - 11:05 am
11.5 The Forgotten Asset: A Strategic Risk-Based Approach to Culvert Asset Management
Presenter: Simon Kras, E.I.T., B.Sc., B.A.Sc., Opus DaytonKnight Consultants Ltd., North Vancouver, BC
Additional Contributors: Kelvin Carey, P.Eng, Opus DaytonKnight Consultants Ltd., North Vancouver, BC; Robert Lew, E.I.T., Opus DaytonKnight Consultants Ltd., North Vancouver, BC; Ed Clark, P.Eng., City of Burnaby, Burnaby, BC; Richard Friio, C.E.T., City of Burnaby, Burnaby, BC

 


Stormwater assets often receive less attention than watermains or sewers in municipal asset management plans.  Management strategies are frequently limited to brief inspections of large diameter culverts on major roads.  However, a large percentage of the culverts in North America were built between 1960 and 1980 and may require repair or replacement in the next 10 years.  Adopting a methodical approach which considers the consequences of failure can direct funding where it is most critical. Opus DaytonKnight developed a quantitative risk-based culvert assessment methodology for the City of Burnaby that considers the probability and consequences of failure of the culvert. Probability of failure is based on the condition of the culvert, while a quantitative measure of the consequence of failure is derived from factors such as traffic, culvert size and culvert depth. The methodology was pilot tested and refined on 25 large diameter culverts selected by the City. This presentation will describe our methodology, quantify the benefits of consequence based culvert assessment and will describe how capital planning can be carried out based on limited knowledge of asset condition. The advent of wireless networking and handheld devices provides new tools for inspectors, allowing personnel to map critical assets by size, age, condition, or time since last inspection.  Opus International has been using cloud-based and server-based tools to record point assets in transportation engineering.  The benefits of using handheld devices for planning culvert inspections will be illustrated on the City of Burnaby’s sample set of 25 culverts during this presentation.

Presentation PDF

 


Asset Management II | 11:10 am - 11:40 am
11.6 Tracking Pump Station Ownership Costs: 9-Year Asset Management Case Study
Presenter: Alexander Tabb, Smith & Loveless, Inc., Lenexa, KS

 


To inform and educate attendees about the basic concepts of the Wet Well Mounted Pump Stations, giving insight into the Wet Well Mounted Pump Station concepts and how they have advanced.  Will discuss some of the different types of stations, as well as the advantages of doing preventative maintenance and repairs outside of the sewage.  Actual 9-year cost comparison, conducted by a municipality, in regards to Wet Well Mounted Pump Stations vs. Submersibles.  Whether it’s your staff or outside contractors maintaining and replacing your submersible pumps, you’re likely spending a lot more money and resources on your pump stations than necessary.  Advise attendees of the benefits of performing preventative maintenance and keeping good records of resources spent on specific installation to pinpoint where money can be saved, how resources can be used more efficiently and how to help predict budgetary issues that may arise. Learning Objectives : Recognize the need for Asset Management, and the benefits that come from knowing where and why money is being spent.  Attendee will understand the basics of wet well mounted pump stations and the need to track their assets.  Parties need to be able to track their resources and determine how resources can be saved, while also being able to better predict future needs.  While resources are finite, the ability to have tracking capabilities allows for better budgeting and planning for municipalities.

Presentation PDF



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