2013 Technical Session 9 - Residuals Resource Recovery

Monday, April 22, 1:55 - 5:00 pm, Pennask Room


Moderator: Umar Alfaruq, CH2M HILL

 

9.1 Anaerobic Co-Digestion of Fruit Juice and Municipal Biowaste in the Okanagan Valley

9.2 Biosolids - Garbage to Gravel Pit Greening in a NIMBY Culture.

9.3 Canada’s First National Biosolids Policy - Discovering the Canada-wide Approach and Guidance Document for the Beneficial Use of Municipal Biosolids, Municipal Sludge and Treated Septage

9.4 New Directions in Organic Waste Management

9.5 Use of Biosolids in Landfill Closures to Improve Landfill Cover Systems

 


Residuals and Resource Recovery | 1:55 pm - 2:25 pm
9.1 Anaerobic Co-Digestion of Fruit Juice and Municipal Biowaste in the Okanagan Valley
Presenter: Mariel Barrantes Leiva, B.Sc., University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, Kelowna, BC
Additional Contributors: Dr. Cigdem Eskicioglu, Ph.D., P.Eng.

 


The Okanagan Valley is known for wineries and fruit production. Therefore, the region has established fruit processing companies, which produces fruit bars, soups, and fruit juices. Fruit juice industry involves organic raw material; hence part of the by-products (waste effluents) contain significant organic matter. Brandt’s Creek Tradewaste Treatment Plant treats wastewater coming from SunRype and Calona Vineyards (fruit juice and winery industries). Also, the Kelowna Wastewater Treatment Plant treats the sewage water prior been disposal into the Okanagan Lake. Both scenarios deal with a secondary effluent: solids waste. This study evaluated the co-digestion performance of two fruit juice waste streams (thickened waste activated sludge and screen cake) with a municipal sludge cake in order to evaluate the possibility of replacing current disposal methods. Both single and co-digestion scenarios were tested in mesophilic and thermophilic semi-continuous flow digesters at a sludge retention time of 20 days and 10 days. Both digestion studies demonstrated that co-digestion of fruit-juice streams with municipal sludge cake resulted in higher specific methane yields [1,322 ± 109 ml/g volatile solids (VS) removed] compared to single digestion (571 ± 61 ml/g VS removed) of the industrial streams due the more desirable carbon to nitrogen ratios. Overall, the results indicate significant advantage for co-digestion over single-digestion of industrial streams with high carbon (sugar) content.

Presentation PDF
 


Residuals and Resource Recovery | 2:30 pm - 3:00 pm
9.2 Biosolids - Garbage to Gravel Pit Greening in a NIMBY Culture
Presenter: John Lavery, M.Sc., R.P. Bio., P.Ag., SYLVIS, New Westminster, BC
Additional Contributors: Chris Radford, AScT, Director of Environmental Services, Regional District of Central Okanagan, Kelowna, BC

 


In a culture of ‘not-in-my-backyard’ (NIMBY) and burning biosolids, the Regional District of Central Okanagan (RDCO) recently and successfully shifted their paradigm from biosolids disposal to development of a successful land application program.  In 2010, the RDCO, facing a ban on landfill disposal, required an option to manage 5,000 m3 of Class B biosolids annually. The RDCO desired management opportunities that provided long-term diversity and flexibility and reflected their commitment to promoting public health, environmental sustainability and cost effectiveness. Opportunities were assessed using a triple bottom line approach and recommendations made to pursue reclamation of degraded land. Partnerships with land owners and managers were developed and reclamation of two unused sand and gravel extraction areas along Highway 97C were identified as areas which would benefit from nutrients and organic matter provided by the RDCO’s biosolids.  In partnership with the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, approximately 9,000 m3 of biosolids were successfully land applied in 2011 and 2012 resulting in reclamation of more than 19 hectares of degraded land. With the RDCO scenario provided as a case study, this presentation will provide attendees with knowledge of the processes employed and tools required to develop and sustain a successful land application program.  Details will include: opportunity identification; triple bottom line evaluation; partnership development; and, operational land application considerations.
 
Presentation PDF


Residuals and Resource Recovery | 3:05 pm - 3:35 pm
9.3 Canada’s First National Biosolids Policy - Discovering the Canada-wide Approach and Guidance Document for the Beneficial Use of Municipal Biosolids, Municipal Sludge and Treated Septage
Presenter: Denise Vieira, RPBio, SYLVIS, New Westminster, BC
Additional Contributors: Maryam Mofidpoor, M.Sc., P.Ag., BC Ministry  of Environment, Victoria, BC

 


With implementation of the Canada wide Strategy for the Management Municipal Wastewater Effluent, changes are expected in the quantity and quality of biosolids produced.  In July 2008, the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) composed of representatives from the federal, provincial and territorial governments formed the Biosolids Task Group (BTG).  The mandate of the BTG was to develop a Canada-wide Approach for the management of municipal biosolids and sludge, focusing on the development of a harmonized national policy and regulatory framework. A key component of the Canada – wide Approach was the establishment of a policy statement and supporting principles which “promotes the beneficial use of valuable resources such as nutrients, organic matter, and energy contained within municipal biosolids, municipal sludge and treated septage.” Accompanying the Canada-wide Approach is a “Guidance Document for the Beneficial Use of Municipal Biosolids, Municipal Sludge and Treated Septage” which provides best management practices for use by Canadian jurisdictions in implementing policies or regulations for the beneficial use of biosolids.In October 2012, the Canadian Environment Ministers approved the Canada-wide Approach for the Management of Wastewater Biosolids; the Guidance Document was published in November 2012. This timely presentation will be delivered by the BC Ministry of Environment’s representative on the Biosolids Task Group and an author of the Guidance Document.  Information will be provided on the development of the Canada-wide Approach; a summary of the intent, content and use of the Guidance Document; and, the applicability of both for biosolids generators, managers and regulators in BC.

Presentation PDF
 


Residuals and Resource Recovery | 3:55 pm - 4:25 pm
9.4 New Directions in Organic Waste Management
Presenter: Seamus Frain, P.Eng., Opus DaytonKnight Consultants Ltd., North Vancouver, BC

 


Change is coming to the way Organic Wastes are bring managed in many municipalities throughout British Columbia.  Green waste is currently composted in most locations, but food waste is still – for the most part – landfilled with ‘garbage’.  In the Greater Vancouver Area, a diversion plan is underway to divert food waste from garbage, and the goal of this diversion plan is to remove approximately 265,000 tonnes of food waste from disposal with garbage by 2015.  Other municipalities are looking at this and considering their own programs to reduce organic waste disposal in landfills. The presentation will focus on the issues and impacts of the food waste diversion program in the Greater Vancouver Area and look at options, technologies and market issues related to dealing with this organics waste stream.  The presentation will illustrate the potential and the opportunity in treating organic waste as a resource, and highlight some pitfalls.  The goal is to present an overview of the issues and trends with a practical assessment of the operational and market aspects of managing and processing this waste stream.

Presentation PDF
 


Residuals and Resource Recovery | 4:30 pm - 5:00 pm
9.5 Use of Biosolids in Landfill Closures to Improve Landfill Cover Systems
Presenter: Janelle Hunt, B.Sc., Metro Vancouver, Burnaby, BC
Additional Contributors: Ben Van Nostrand B.Sc., P.Ag., AScT., Waste Management Co-ordinator, Environmental & Engineering Services, Columbia Shuswap Regional District

 


Treated, dewatered wastewater sludge (also referred to as biosolids) is rich in essential plant nutrients and organic matter that, when mixed with a carbon source (chipped wood waste) and sand, create a fabricated soil, with water holding capacity and abilities to support a wide range of vegetation. In addition, fabricated soils host naturally occurring methanotrophic bacteria which convert fugitive methane emissions to carbon dioxide, a much less potent greenhouse gas. Fabricated soils can improve the performance of landfill covers and are a cost effective alternative to traditional closure soils. In 2010 Metro Vancouver and the Columbia Shuswap Regional District (CSRD) partnered to create a fabricated soil cover system for the closure of the CSRD’s Salmon Arm landfill. Metro Vancouver supplied 10,000 m3 of Class B biosolids which were mixed with sand to create a deep subsoil layer.  In addition, 3,700 m3 of Class A biosolids were mixed with sand and chipped white wood waste, supplied from the landfill’s woodwaste diversion program, to create topsoil.  The resulting one metre thick soil cover layer was designed to not only grow grass but also to support 2,300 shallow rooting hybrid poplar trees. These trees are now being used to phytoremediate landfill leachate. To date the poplar trees have grown in excess of 5 meters in height and over a million litres of landfill leachate has been applied to the plantation.  Not only does the fabricated soil cover system support the poplar/phytoremediation area but it has also been beneficial in stabilizing side slopes of the landfill to prevent slope failure and runoff issues.

Presentation PDF



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