2013 Technical Session 6 - Climate Change

Monday, April 22, 1:55 - 5:00 pm, Skeena Room


Moderator: Jon Fennell, Integrated Sustainability Consultants Ltd.

 

6.1 Assessing the effectiveness of climate change adaptation policies: residential water use choices

6.2 Effects of Climate Change on Water Utilties

6.3 Sea Level Rise Adaptation

6.4 Stormwater Management Today and into the Future

6.5 Weather Modification and Geoengineering

 


Climate Change | 1:55 pm - 2:25 pm
6.1 Assessing the effectiveness of climate change adaptation policies: residential water use choices
Presenter: Steve Conrad, , Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC
Additional Contributors: Joel Pipher, Research Assistant, Simon Fraser University; Dr. Wolfgang Haider, Project Supervisor, Simon Fraser University; Dr. Murray Rutherford, Project Advisor, Simon Fraser University; Dr. David Yates, Project Advisor, University Corporation for Atmos

 


My presentation will focus on illustrating results from the Regional Adaptation Collaborative Project - Assessing the effectiveness of climate change adaptation policies: a survey of residential and farmer preferences. This project was a collaborative exercise between local, regional, provincial, and national agencies to measure and include customer preferences in regional policymaking. The agencies involved included: Principal Research Team, Simon Fraser University, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Technical Steering Committee, Okanagan Basin Water Board, City of Kelowna, South East Kelowna Irrigation District, BC Ministry of Agriculture, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, University of British Columbia, Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen.
The purpose of the study was to survey water users in the Kelowna, BC area to determine public perceptions and preferences of water demand management alternatives and to gauge which alternatives the community would most readily accept. As policymakers develop new water management strategies for climate adaptation, it is crucial that proposed solutions will result in real changes to water consumption. This project uses survey methods to estimate the “human behaviour” component in water management. Internet surveys assess the preferences of water users for different water conservation and demand management policies, using the most up-to-date social science techniques.

Presentation PDF
 


Climate Change | 2:30 pm - 3:00 pm
6.2 Effects of Climate Change on Water Utilties
Presenter: Kenan Ozekin & Martin Allen Kenan Ozekin  & Martin Allen, Kenan Ozekin, Ph.D; Martin Allen, Ph.D, Water Research Foundation, Denver, CO

 


Climate change models, in general, predict an overall warming of the earth.  The warmer temperatures are predicted to decrease dissolved oxygen levels, incresased contaminant load to water bodies, reduce stream ans river flows, and foster algal blooms. Many utilities that do not currently experience these problems may find themselves facing new water quality challenges relating to sedimentation, nutrients, and pathogens. Consequently, water utilities will need to develop new water treatment opotions and technologies to continue to meet standards, and maintain taste and odour quality. The Water Research Foundation implemented a "Climate Change Strategic Initiative" to focus on impacts of climate change on water supplies.  Since 2009, more than 15 projects were funded addressing aspects of climate change and impacts on utilties. This presentation wil provide an overview of the potential effects of climate change and present results from on-going and completed projects.

Presentation PDF
 


Climate Change | 3:05 pm - 3:35 pm
6.3 Sea Level Rise Adaptation
Presenter: Colin Kristiansen, P.Eng., MBA, Delcan, Burnaby, BC

 


This presentation will describe the ongoing collaboration between municipalities, the Province, universities and consultants to develop a range of solutions, plus a regulatory and funding framework to deliver them over the next several decades.

Presentation PDF
 


Climate Change | 3:55 pm - 4:25 pm
6.4 Stormwater Management Today and into the Future
Presenter: Matt Cameron, P.Eng., FEC, CTQ Consultants Ltd, Kelowna, BC


With today’s focus on sustainability , stormwater management has evolved from simply collecting runoff and piping it to a discharge point with little or no treatment to managing quantity, flow and quality with emphasis on the water balance locally and regionally. Designers also face the challenge of meeting existing bylaw requirements that are not necessarily relevant to every situation. There needs to be flexibility with the approval process to enable innovative solutions in this changing environment. The variables and assumptions that are incorporated into the design process need to be fully understood and the sensitivity of each of these assessed to quantify the impact on the outcome. With development venturing into ever more challenging hillside topography, stormwater management is an even more essential and challenging component of the design process. While trying to manage post-development conditions to predevelopment situations designers can no longer simply consider peak flows - the impact of total flow, duration of high flows, point of discharge and discharge quality are equally important. This paper discusses challenges faced in both the planning and implementation of infrastructure designs in the Okanagan with its semi-arid climate and resultant types of weather events. Relevant case studies addressing design and regulatory challenges are presented, and lessons transferable to other jurisdictions are examined.

Presentation PDF
 


Climate Change | 4:30 pm - 5:00 pm
6.5 Weather Modification and Geoengineering
Presenter: Don Nash, P.Eng., BCWWA Water Sustainability Committee, Burnaby, BC

 


Most people now accept that day-to-day human activity is inadvertently modifying global climate.  Less well known, however, is that active weather modification has also been around for a long time and is becoming increasingly prevalent today.  Weather modification is used for hail mitigation, snow pack augmentation, fog dissipation, and to make it rain among other uses.  It involves a whole host of techniques that have local and non-local effects. Geoengineering takes weather modification to a new level with proposed techniques such as stratospheric aerosol geoengineering, massive carbon sequestration projects for capture and storage, cloud whitening technology to reflect sunlight back to space, space sunshade proposals, heat transport mechanisms for mixing cooler deep ocean water with warmer surface water, and the list goes on. This presentation explores what is currently happening globally as well as on the ground in British Columbia and Canada and what this might mean for the future of water sustainability and governance.

Presentation PDF

 



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