2013 Technical Session 4 - Wastewater Issues I

Monday, April 22, 8:00 - 11:40 am, Shuswap Room


Moderator: David Lycon, AECOM

 

4.1 Application of process auditing and optimization to minimize operational and capital costs at wastewater treatment facilities

4.2 Capital Regional District Core Area I&I Management Plan

4.3 Finding the Perfect Fit: An Overview of Blower Technologies

4.4 Water Reuse Opportunities: Dawson Creek Reclaim Waste Water Facility

4.5 Operations Focused Design, Construction, and Startup of a Cold Weather Advanced Nutrient Removal Facility

 


Wastewater Issues I | 8:00 am - 8:30 am
4.1 Application of process auditing and optimization to minimize operational and capital costs at wastewater treatment facilities
Presenter: Eustina Musvoto, Ph.D, TruSense Consulting Services, Port Moody, BC

 

 


Due to a number of factors, the different treatment units in a wastewater treatment plant do not always operate at their optimum level. Non optimal performance causes various problems such as reduction in capacity, increased operating costs and failure to comply with final effluent quality standards. To solve these problems, it is prudent to carry out a thorough audit and evaluation of the plant before making any operational changes and/or design modifications and refurbishments.  Non optimal performance is usually process and/or equipment related.  The audit identifies what the problems are and what needs to be done to achieve the desired operational efficiency for the whole plant.  Application of mathematical modeling for process optimization is a key part of these audits. The improvements in computer based mathematical models for wastewater treatment over the past few years has enabled these tools to be applied with confidence in process optimization resulting in major benefits to plant owners. Some of the benefits are improvement in operation & control and hence performance of the plant, reduction in operational costs (energy, sludge disposal, chemicals), deferment of capital investment through better utilization of existing capacity, reduced capital investment to meet more stringent final effluent discharge standards and better assessment of future capacity needs. This paper outlines the process auditing and optimization methodology and discusses case studies where application of this approach resulted in substantial savings in operational and capital costs.

Presentation PDF
 


Wastewater Issues I | 8:35 am - 9:05 am
4.2 Capital Regional District Core Area I&I Management Plan
Presenter: Andrew Boyland, P.Eng., Kerr Wood Leidal Associates Ltd., Burnaby, BC
Additional Contributors: Malcolm Cowley, P.Eng., CRD, Victoria, BC; Jim McAloon, B.Sc., CRD, Victoria, BC; Chris Johnston, P.Eng., KWL, Burnaby, BC

 

 


At the beginning of 2012, the Capital Regional District fulfilled a commitment to submit a comprehensive I&I management plan to BC’s Ministry of Environment.  This was mandated by the Core Area Liquid Waste Management Plan, which also contains a stated goal of reducing peak wet weather flow to less than four times average dry weather flow by the year 2031. The Core Area of the Capital Regional District (CRD) is a partnership of seven local governments and two First Nations.  Nine individual I&I management plans were developed based on an agreed upon methodology that applies equally to each of the partners.  These plans were amalgamated in a report that addresses the following questions:  What is the regulatory context for I&I management     How is I&I quantified and how can it be addressed? What is the plan for dealing with I&I originating on private property? How do the Core Area municipalities plan to address I&I from public property? How will the plans be monitored and verified? The private property I&I portion of the plan outlines a timeline with action items for reducing I&I on private property.  The public property I&I portion of the plan involves classifying sewer catchments into “archetypes” based on the average age of the sewers and the measured I&I rates.  Each “archetype” has a distinct rehabilitation plan associated with it.    The I&I Management Plan will be used to carry out I&I reduction in a responsible, cost effective, integrated and well planned manner.
 
Presentation PDF


Wastewater Issues I | 9:10 am - 9:40 am
4.3 Finding the Perfect Fit: An Overview of Blower Technologies
Presenter: Colleen Orth, HSI Blowers, a part of the Atlas Copco Group, Houston, TX

 

 


When planning, expanding, or redesigning an aeration system one must begin the search of finding the perfect blower. Considering that performing a google search of “aeration blowers for wastewater treatment “results in about 116,000 possible sites means that one must have some point of reference or tool to begin the blower selection process. Overall, this presentation will give a holistic view of the basic categories for blower technologies, while diving into the ideal niche and brief history for each blower technology. Most importantly, when exploring the performance specialty of each blower, it is also vital to evaluate the blower based on all of its characteristics. This presentation will focus on looking at factors that should be considered in the blower selection process, and current efforts to standardized power evaluation amongst technologies. Blower Basics: Blower and Compressor Technologies applied in wastewater aeration systems can be placed into two basic categories: positive displacement and dynamic. Positive displacement entraps a volume of gas and reduces it, while dynamic compressors depend on velocity to transfer energy from the compressor rotor to the process. The category of dynamic can be further divided into centrifugal and axial. However, axial is rarely seen in municipal wastewater field. Finding A Way to Evaluate: All blower technologies can be employed in an efficient way when used in the right project.  On an occasion there are scenarios when a myriad of blower technologies are capable of meeting performance, and it may seem like product selection is insignificant.  However, if all factors are assessed it will become clear that one blower is a better fit than another.  To find the perfect fit it is imperative that attributes such as maintenance costs, installation location (indoor/outdoor), frequency of starts/stops, pressure levels, and power costs.
 
Presentation PDF


Wastewater Issues I | 10:00 am - 10:30 am
4.4 Water Reuse Opportunities: Dawson Creek Reclaim Waste Water Facility
Presenter: Martin Hildebrand, P.Eng., Nelson Environmental Inc., Winnipeg, MB

 

 


The city of Dawson Creek, located in northeastern British Columbia, gets its water from the Kiskatinaw River, which is a tributary of the Peace River. This source is often plagued by high turbidity during the spring and low water levels in the summer. Recent growth in the oil and gas sector has led to increased pressure on Dawson Creek available water supply. To address the demand for potable water, the city decided to build a Reclamation Water Treatment Plant to produce a minimum of 4000m3/day of treated wastewater that meets the province’s standards.. The wastewater also had to meet BC’s municipal sewage regulations for reclaimed water (similar to California title 22) year round and which is challenging in extreme climate conditions. A SAGR (Submerged Attached Growth Reactor) was chosen to provide year round BOD and TSS polishing, as well as year round ammonia removal of
 
Presentation PDF


Wastewater Issues I | 10:35 am - 11:05 am
4.5 Operations Focused Design, Construction, and Startup of a Cold Weather Advanced Nutrient Removal Facility
Presenter: Dan Harmon, PE (MT, WA, ID,OR - USA), HDR Engineering, Missoula, Montana
Additional Contributors: Tom Adams, City of Bozeman Montana; Coralynn Revis,PE, HDR Engineering; Herb Bartle, City of Bozeman, Montana

 

 


The City of Bozeman, Montana recently completed the successful design, construction and startup of an upgrade and expansion of the City’s only activated sludge wastewater treatment plant to an advanced biological nutrient removal system.  The project also included an initial expansion of the facility from a maximum month flow of 6.5 MGD to 10.6 MGD.  Because of the State of Montana, USA's ongoing Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) limit effort on the East Gallatin River, potential for more restrictive nutrient limits in the future, and very cold weather climate, the City of Bozeman elected to employ a 5-Stage Bardenpho biological nutrient removal treatment process.  Initial target effluent nutrient concentrations are 7.5 mg/L total nitrogen and 1.0 mg/L total phosphorous.  Key challenges the City of Bozeman faced included an operations staff with limited experience in operating an advanced nutrient removal facility and the need for an operator-friendly treatment facility capable of quickly and easily meeting effluent nutrient load limits. To address these key challenges, the City of Bozeman’s operations staff and design team formed a collaborative partnership with an operations-focused approach.  City staff immersed themselves in extensive technical training, started-up and successfully operated an interim phase biological nitrogen removal process within their existing activated sludge treatment process, and more importantly became a part of the project design team to develop unique facility features focused on ease of operation and maximizing nutrient removal performance.

Presentation PDF
 


Wastewater Issues I | 11:10 am - 11:40 am
4. 6 Beyond the Rubble - Emergency Wastewater Management in Haiti
Presenter: Jennifer Crosby, P. Eng., Metro Vancouver, Burnaby, BC

 

 


On January 12th, 2010 at 4:53 p.m., a 7.0-magnitude earthquake hit 15km west of the Haitian capital, Port-au-Prince (PaP), the country’s most densely populated city. It was the most powerful earthquake to hit Haiti in over 200 years. This caused severe and widespread damage. The most recent estimates indicate that 230,000 people lost their lives; 300,000 more were injured and over 1 million were left homeless. In addition, over 500,000 people were infected and 7000 people have died from the cholera outbreak that started later that same year. This massive displacement of people in a crowded urban environment posed multiple health and sanitation concerns. In an effort to address these, NGOs began providing mobile latrines throughout the internally displaced persons (IDP) camps. Special sanitation trucks would come and remove the waste (desludge) from the latrines at least one a week depending on the number of camp residents. The use of mobile latrines was not a common practice in Haiti prior to the earthquake and there were no facilities for these desludging trucks to properly dispose of their waste.  Trucks were found to be dumping the waste in uncontrolled locations throughout the city.  This led to increased health and sanitation risks as well as concerns for the environment. This paper discusses what was done to address this urgent need for wastewater management and the complex project that was undertaken to close the temporary wastewater lagoon that was built in the City’s solid waste dump.

Presentation PDF



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