2013 Technical Session 3 - Drinking Water Issues I

Monday, April 22, 8:00 - 11:40 am, Pennask Room


Moderator: Timothy Phelan, Opus DaytonKnight

 

3.1 Air or Particles – What Are The Turbidity Spikes In My Membrane Effluent

3.2 Arsenic Treatment Basics: What to Consider in Technology Selection

3.3 Conceptual Solutions to Reality--Lake Country Implements Step 1 of the their Water Master Plan

3.4 Lessons Learned from the start-up and commissioning of the Nanoose Bay Peninsula Water Treatment Plant

3.5 Reverse Osmosis: What is it? What is it used for?

3.6 Sustainability of nitrate-contaminated water treatment by multi cycle ion-exchange/bioregeneration of selective resin

 


Drinking Water Issues I | 8:00 am - 8:30 am
3.1 Air or Particles – What Are The Turbidity Spikes In My Membrane Effluent
Presenter: John Koch, PE, BCEE, HDR Engineering, Inc., LaConner, WA
Multimedia sand filtration, a tried and proven technology, has been used successfully for years in surface water filtration plants, with turbidity as the continuous on-line analytical monitoring and control parameter.  Many of the regulations and guidelines were promulgated when membrane filtration technology was in its infancy and only limited testing data were available.  This paper uses a case study to illustrate the potential regulatory hurdles that could be caused by post-membrane gas release and practical approaches that resolved this problem. During the startup period, the turbidity and particle counts exceeded the Department of Health threshold limits.  The plants’s SCADA system showed that spikes occurred after every backwash and after the daily pressure decay test (PDT).  An investigation ensued, and minute air bubbles were observed in the tubing and rotometers that led to each instrument.  It became apparent that entrained/dissolved air in the membrane feed water was released into the membrane filtrate, migrated to the instruments, and registered as particles, causing false positive turbidity and particle count readings.  This paper will describe innovative actions taken to successfully reduce the influence of entrained air and the procedures used to demonstrate to the regulatory agencies that the membrane filtration system was fully operational and compliant with regulatory guidelines.
 


Drinking Water Issues I | 8:35 am - 9:05 am
3.2 Arsenic Treatment Basics: What to Consider in Technology Selection
Presenter: Claire Bayless, M.A.Sc., P.Eng., Opus DaytonKnight Consultants Ltd., North Vancouver, BC
This paper is an introduction to arsenic treatment in drinking water. This presentation will provide an overview covering the background behind the current Canadian Drinking Water guideline; a variety of treatment technologies that are commonly implemented for arsenic treatment, engineering process design considerations, and operations and maintenance considerations. The current Canadian Drinking Water guideline Maximum Acceptable Concentration for arsenic is 0.01 mg/L and how and why this came to be is a compelling story, with a brief discussion on events that occurred elsewhere in the world. This presentation will include the pros and cons of various technologies for arsenic treatment and highlight the main engineering design considerations, including water quality, chemical pretreatment, treatment technology selection, wastewater and media disposal, equipment sizing, footprint, and life cycle costing. The aim of this presentation is to identify the key considerations that should be asked by managers, engineers and operators when reviewing arsenic treatment proposals.

Presentation PDF
 


Drinking Water Issues I | 9:10 am - 9:40 am
3.3 Conceptual Solutions to Reality - Lake Country Implements Step 1 of the their Water Master Plan
Presenter: Greg Buchholz, A.Sc.T., District of Lake Country, Lake Country, BC
Additional Contributors: Jeremy Clowes, P.Eng., Urban Systems Ltd., Kelowna, BC
From zapping crypto to putting out fires—the District of Lake Country will share their experiences in executing Step 1 of their Water Master Plan over the past year.  The main aspects of this construction project involved integrating two separate water systems, retrofitting a UV disinfection system into an existing pump station, replacing an intake system upstream of the intake spillway and adding balancing and fire storage. The District will identify how the upgrades fit into their long term plans and discuss typical challenges being faced by water purveyors in the Okanagan valley.  Design and construction challenges will be reviewed including industry changes in determining acceptable UV doses, allowing for a reservoir to be filled from two sources with different treatment needs and squeezing a new intake system into a tight space while complying with DFO and environmental requirements.  The presentation will close with a review of how the upgraded water systems has performed to date and lessons learned from the commissioning process and the first few months of operation.

Presentation PDF
 


Drinking Water Issues I | 10:00 am - 10:30 am
3.4 Lessons Learned from the start-up and commissioning of the Nanoose Bay Peninsula Water Treatment Plant
Presenter: Jesse Maddaloni, P.Eng, M.A.Sc, WorleyParsons Canada, Victoria, BC
WorleyParsons was retained by the Regional District of Nanaimo to design and manage the construction of the Nanoose Bay Peninsula Water Treatment Plant located in Nanoose Bay, British Columbia. The plant is designed to handle influent pressures up to 150 psig and to treat flows up to 2,000 L/min (500 gpm) of well water having a maximum iron content of 0.8 mg/L, manganese content of 0.7 mg/L, and ammonia content of 1.5 mg/L. The plant treats for the removal of iron and manganese through oxidation and filtration. The plant also includes a filter backwash system including supernatant reclaim and re-injection into the system influent line. The treatment plant was recently commissioned. Therefore, interesting challenges experienced and lessons learned during the commissioning/ start-up phase will be discussed in the presentation. In addition, the actual operation of the plant after start-up will be discussed and compared to the water quality targets using water quality results obtained from prolonged monitoring. We will also discuss the intended and actual performance of the residuals management system.
 


Drinking Water Issues I | 10:35 am - 11:05 am
3.5 Reverse Osmosis: What is it? What is it used for?
Presenter: Scott Foster, BI Pure Water Canada Inc., Surrey, BC
RO 101.The discussion will start out on what is RO.  Basic RO system P and I D will be discussed   The P and I D will also include other technologies often used with RO in order to make it work.   A few examples will be provided to include why we use differing stages and the use of blending to add back alkalinity. Reverse Osmosis has an important place in water treatment but is often misunderstood.  Examples will be provided on Nano filtration to Desalination and how they are used with differing water chemistries.  RO can be a life saver or a maintenance nightmare, an example of misapplications will be discussed.   This will focus on colloidal matter, and scaling chemistry.  These problems generally shows up after the membranes are plugged and are unrecoverable. This will lead into how anti-scalents are used and how they can reduce RO cleaning intervals and reduce pre-treatment requirements.  Some examples of costs per cubic meter of water produced will be given along with expected operating costs showing how all RO is not the same.  The three cost components analyzed will be capital costs energy cost, and maintenance costs.  To finish off, a look at advancements in Reverse Osmosis design and membrane developments will conclude the presentation.

Presentation PDF
 


Drinking Water Issues I | 11:10 am - 11:40 am
3.6 Sustainability of nitrate-contaminated water treatment by multi cycle ion-exchange/bioregeneration of selective resin
Presenter: Shelir Ebrahimi, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, BC
Additional Contributors: Deborah J. Roberts, Full Professor, PhD, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, BC
One of the most common methods for the removal of nitrate from drinking water is ion exchange using nitrate selective resin. Single-use resins have a great capacity for nitrate but since there are no viable methods for regenerating them, they are replaced after exhaustion and incinerated or disposed in a landfill, making the ion exchange process environmentally and economically unsustainable. The sustainability of nitrate-contaminated water treatment processes can be achieved by regenerating the exhausted resin several times. In this study, multi cycle loading and bioregeneration of trybutylamine strong base anion (SBA) exchange resin was studied. After each cycle of exhaustion, biological regeneration of the resin was performed using a salt-tolerant, perchlorate-reducing culture. The resin was enclosed in a membrane to avoid direct contact of the resin with the culture. Initial process optimization was performed by examining the effect of temperature and salt concentration on the bioregeneration of the resin. The results show that the culture was capable of regenerating the resin and allowing the resin to be used for 4 cycles of exhaustion without losing capacity, after 6 cycles only 6% of the capacity was lost.

Presentation PDF



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