2013 Technical Session 2 - Municipal Utility Management I

Monday, April 22, 8:00 - 11:40 am, Skeena Room


Moderator: Hala Titus, Black & Veatch

 
2.1 Association of Boards of Certification Update

2.2 Balancing Service and Cost for Critical Infrastructure: Constructing a Dyke in City of Burnaby over a Critical Forcemain

2.3 City of Merritt  -  Financial Planning for a Sustainable Water Supply System

2.4 Optimize the Design of W/WW Treatment Infrastructure using CFD Modelling

2.5 Planning for the Future: Sanitary Sewer Master Planning for the City of Merritt

2.6 Risk and Resilience Management of Water and Wastewater Systems: Using the RAMCAP Methodology


 Municipal Utility Management I | 8:00 am - 8:30 am
2.1 Association of Boards of Certification Update
Presenter: Paul Bishop, CAE, EPCOR Water Services and Association of Boards of Certification, Ankeny, Iowa
Additional Contributors: Brent Herring, ABC President, United Water; Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island;  Brian Thorburn AScT, ABC President-Elect EPCOR Water, French Creek, BC


In 1972, water and wastewater industry leaders began conversations that developed the groundwork for an association to foster operator certification throughout North America and reduce the diversity among certification programs. From those early discussions, the Association of Boards of Certification was born. Today, our Association includes almost 100 certifying authorities, representing more than 40 states, 10 Canadian provinces and territories, as well as several international programs. These programs have certified more than 240,000 water and wastewater operators, laboratory analysts, plant maintenance technologists, biosolids land appliers, and backflow prevention assembly testers. There are many new initiatives that ABC has undertaken and this will be further explained during the presentation



Municipal Utility Management I | 8:35 am - 9:05 am
2.2 Balancing Service and Cost for Critical Infrastructure: Constructing a Dyke in City of Burnaby over a Critical Forcemain
Presenter: Ed Clark, P.Eng., City of Burnaby, Public Works, Burnaby, BC
Additional Contributors: Hesham Dief, Ph.D., P.Eng., Levelton Consultants Ltd., Surrey, BC


This paper deals with balancing competing critical infrastructure needs with levels of service, and cost. As an example, a recent project for the City of Burnaby involved the construction of critical Fraser River flood protection over the alignment of a critical Metro Vancouver forcemain. The Reach 6 Fraser River flood protection program for the City of Burnaby involved designing and building a 450 m length of dyke over the alignment of the 1060 mm diameter Metro Vancouver Marshend sanitary force main. The steel force main is over 30 years old, has lap-welded joints, and lacked reliable "as built" information. Project challenges included avoiding significant loading and settlement of the force main, balancing the remaining life of the force main with the service life of the dyke, accommodating sea level rise, and avoiding impacts to the red-coded shoreline on the Fraser River. The particular reach of river is well below the current 200 year flood construction elevation, and with recent potential flooding events, the construction of dyking in this area is considered highly important.  Risks included premature deterioration and failure of the Marshend force main could destroy the dyke. This would be especially undesirable during a seismic event, considering the potential for tsunami-related flooding. Alignment options for dyking were limited – with industrial development to the north, the highly important fish habitat on the Fraser River to the south, and the Marshend force main located in-between. Options included reducing the road width, relocating the force main, and constructing a non-standard dyke either with sheet pile or steepened embankments.
 



Municipal Utility Management I | 9:10 am - 9:40 am
2.3 City of Merritt  -  Financial Planning for a Sustainable Water Supply System
Presenter: Walt Bayless, P.Eng., Opus DaytonKnight, North Vancouver, BC
Additional Contributors: Shawn Boven, City of Merritt; Ian Rose-Innes, P.Eng., Opus DaytonKnight


The City of Merritt operates a $35 Million dollar water supply and distribution system.  The City’s annual revenues are around $450,000, which are used to fund the operations, administration and long term maintenance of the system.  The City wanted to confirm the long term financial sustainability of the revenue envelope and determine if they were charging a sustainable and appropriate tariff for the water service. Opus DaytonKnight utilized the City’s available asset inventory and the historical financial data to evaluate the sustainability of the City’s current water tariff structure.  Based on this analysis the City would be exposed to a significant future debt burden and associated expenses related to borrowing costs.  Alternative approaches were evaluated using a comprehensive engineering/financial model developed by Opus DaytonKnight .  It was determined that through asset management the City would be able to maintain the existing tariff but nearly eliminate the excessive borrowing, which would be required without asset management.

Presentation PDF
 



Municipal Utility Management I | 10:00 am - 10:30 am
2.4 Optimize the Design of W/WW Treatment Infrastructure using CFD Modelling
Presenter: Stephen Horsman, P.Eng, PE, AECOM, Kelowna, BC
Additional Contributors: Ryan Edison, PE, AECOM, Grand Rapids, MA; Brett deWynter, P.Eng., AECOM, Kelowna, BC


Reinvesting in aging W/WW treatment infrastructure is a complex and often costly task faced by municipalities across BC. Those familiar with the design and construction of retrofits for W/WW treatment infrastructure projects know the high level of complexity and challenges involved with re-purposing an existing facility while maintain the current function. Successful retro-fit projects require creative solutions that focus on maximizing the re-use of existing infrastructure, sometimes for purposes quite different than their original design. These creative solutions often lie outside the scope of the standard methods and calculations used by engineers. To improve design certainty and to assess process performance prior to construction, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling can be a useful tool to optimize the capital reinvestment in W/WW treatment infrastructure.  The effective use of CFD modelling offers Owners an opportunity to extend the useful life of existing infrastructure; thereby lowering the overall life cycle costs of their facilities. This presentation will highlight the function and limitations of CFD modelling for the design of W/WW treatment infrastructure. The recommendations offered within the presentation will be supported by several case studies within BC and abroad. The case studies will highlight a range of applications including: a multi-million dollar pump intake design Metro Vancouver Trickling Filter Pump #5; flow splitting for the re-provisioning of the 1100 ML/d Sha Tin Water Treatment Works; retrofit of the Penticton DAF clarifier inlet design; baffling characteristics of an 8ML clearwell; and water age assessment and mixing performance of a 2ML potable water distribution reservoir.

Presentation PDF
 



Municipal Utility Management I | 10:35 am - 11:05 am
2.5 Planning for the Future: Sanitary Sewer Master Planning for the City of Merritt
Presenter: Shawn Boven, AScT, City of Merritt, BC, Merritt, BC
Additional Contributors: Julien Bell, P.Eng., GeoAdvice Inc., Port Moody; BC;Werner de Schaetzen, Ph.D., P.Eng., GeoAdvice Inc., Port Moody, BC


Many smaller Communities in BC have challenges managing their existing sanitary sewer systems. Those communities have to; maintain adequate service levels, accommodate growth, manage high inflow and infiltration rates, and replace aging infrastructure, all within a limited operating and capital expenditures budget. The City of Merritt, BC has a population of 7,700 with an aggressive growth strategy to double its population by 2031 and has decided to tackle this issue head-on by developing a comprehensive master plan to: review the robustness of their system, identify and prioritize performance upgrades, and review the sustainability of their current utility rate structure. Merritt’s Sanitary Sewer Utility Master Plan consisted of four (4) distinct phases: build a comprehensive all pipe model of the sanitary system, field data collection, system analysis, and detailed financial analysis and utility rate review. Merritt evaluated 14 different landuse and development scenarios and identified that all future capacity issues are limited to one of 8 critical sewer sections; along two of the City’s trunkmains. Further, the review indicated that the system has significant flexibility to accommodate densification and infill development. With the exception of one section of trunkmains, all capacity upgrade recommendations were the result of servicing large new developments expected to occur along the edges of the City.  Financial analysis and utility rate review indicated that the City’s existing utility rates are sustainable to meet the future asset replacement needs; however, short-term shortfall may occur depending on the timing and staging of the work.
 
Presentation PDF



Municipal Utility Management I | 11:10 am - 11:40 am
2.6 Risk and Resilience Management of Water and Wastewater Systems: Using the RAMCAP Methodology
Presenter: Bruce Kerr, Certified Technician (CTech), MA (DEM), KERR & Associates Consulting: Emergency Management, Victoria, BC
 
This presentation is an overview of the standard: Risk Analysis and Management for Critical Asset Protection (RAMCAP) standard for: Risk and Resilience Management of Water and Wastewater Systems (ANSI/ASME-ITI/AWWA J100-10). The ANSI/ASME-ITI/AWWA J100-10 standard sets the requirements for all-hazards risk and resilience analysis and management for the water sector and prescribes methods that can be used for addressing these requirements. The standard documents a process for identifying vulnerabilities to man-made threats, natural hazards, and dependencies and proximity to hazardous sites and provides methods to evaluate the options for improving these weaknesses in water and wastewater utilities. Because of the rigor and consistency in estimating risks, resilience and benefits quantitatively, the results of the evaluation can also be used by utilities to inform their own planning process.

Presentation PDF

 



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