Living Infrastructure and Putting the Bio Back into Bioretention

Description:In our urban environments, how we manage rainwater has a significant impact on local streams and marine habitats. Stormwater runoff from our building and roads often is delivered to these waterways untreated. The runoff is often highly contaminated and unable to support life. There is renewed vigor in our local communities to support healthy streams and clean beaches. The reality of living streams and shorelines in these communities requires the delivery of clean water that supports life. Therefore, runoff from our buildings and roads needs to support life. In pristine landscapes, the natural process of water infiltration, nutrient uptake by plants, and the release of clean, cold water support life in streams. Green infrastructure, and especially the living soils and plants associated with many BMP's, is the best way to integrate these natural process' into urban environments. In almost every development project, there are opportunities to integrate natural processes that will support living systems. Integrating rainwater BMP's into designs helps bring life to city streets and parks, can extend the life of existing pipes and underground works, and improve habitat quality for a diversity of living organisms. Excellence in design requires that we understand both natural system processes and the performance of affected infrastructure. We will use several examples from the Victoria area to illustrate how green infrastructure can be used to integrate natural system processes into urban landscapes and infrastructure systems. Finally, we will discuss the hurdles to integrating these types of designs into our communities.

Authors: Scott Murdoch

Subjects:

Tags:2014 Annual Conference,AC14,AC2014

Citation:Stream F. 2.6.

Publication Date:May 5th, 2014 Upload Date:Jun 30th, 2014

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